We Grow Enough Food to Feed Everyone in This World, So Why Don’t We? (Part 2)

Since food, together with air and water, is one of the three basic items which all living things require without question, it is an ideal subject for economic discussion. Unfortunately, it is also almost ideal for normative economic judgments. “We should” or “they should” abound from intellectual forums to universities to television shows, often . . . → Read More: We Grow Enough Food to Feed Everyone in This World, So Why Don’t We? (Part 2)

We Grow Enough Food to Feed Everyone in This World, So Why Don’t We? (Part 1)

MLB asks:

“Looking around, it seems to me as if one of the greatest economic problems is one of distribution: on the one hand a few own the majority of the resources, while on the other there are large numbers of people who do not have enough to get by. To read the newspapers, . . . → Read More: We Grow Enough Food to Feed Everyone in This World, So Why Don’t We? (Part 1)

Multi-National Food Chains: The Poor Aren’t Buying It

Multi-national food chains are cropping up in poor countries, but no one is buying.

It sounds like a good idea in theory. Poor people require cheap food, and giant food chains can provide them. So why aren’t the poor lined up outside the doors to buy . . . → Read More: Multi-National Food Chains: The Poor Aren’t Buying It

The Default Vegetarian: Thoughts on the Economics of Food

Lately, every time I go to the grocery store, all of the most basic items I routinely purchase seem to have increased in price anywhere from a nickel or two to a dollar or more each. Milk, eggs, cereal products, rice, and fresh vegetables all cost more now than they did just a . . . → Read More: The Default Vegetarian: Thoughts on the Economics of Food

Poor Countries Reject U.S. Answer to World Hunger

At the UN summit in Rome, which ended June 5, the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FOA) appealed to governments to step up to the plate and provide at least $20 billion per year to help feed the world’s hungry.

On the agenda (at least for . . . → Read More: Poor Countries Reject U.S. Answer to World Hunger