That Which Is Unseen

Some economic news:

This morning’s jobs report shows that the economy’s subsidized private sector (industries like health care services that receive big government subsidies) is back as a major source of new hiring.

If a stronger but sustainable U.S. recovery depends on reinvigorating industries not heavily dependent on government largesse, then this hiring out-performance . . . → Read More: That Which Is Unseen

“Cheap Labor”

Turns out it’s neither cheap nor labor:

“In 2010, 36 percent of immigrant-headed households used at least one major welfare program (primarily food assistance and Medicaid) compared to 23 percent of native households,” summarizes the document which was published by the Center for Immigration Studies and examines a wide variety of topics relating to . . . → Read More: “Cheap Labor”

The IRR of UIDAI is over 50 per cent in real terms

We have released a cost-benefit analysis of the UID system. In one line, the result of the calculations, under fairly conservative assumptions, is that the IRR of building the system is 53% in real terms. Hence, building UIDAI is a pretty good use of public money.

Through this page, you can access a short . . . → Read More: The IRR of UIDAI is over 50 per cent in real terms

Transparency in the LPG subsidy

by Viral Shah.

Recently, the Petroleum Minister launched the LPG transparency portals for all three Oil Marketing Companies (OMCs):

The Oil Marketing Companies have been constantly leveraging technology to launch various initiatives for offering convenience to their consumers For example, some of them are offering the facility for booking refill cylinders 24×7online through their . . . → Read More: Transparency in the LPG subsidy

Republican Hypocrisy

CEPR:

This is no doubt how Mitt Romney and other wealthy people would like the public to see the debate. However the reality is that the government has implemented a wide range of policies that have led to a massive upward redistribution of before tax income over the last three decades. These policies have . . . → Read More: Republican Hypocrisy

Liberalism’s Incoherence

David Cay Johnston complains:

The guarantee of landline telephone service at almost any address, a legal right many Americans may not even know they have, is quietly being legislated away in our U.S. state capitals.

AT&T and Verizon, the dominant telephone companies, want to end their 99-year-old universal service obligation known as “provider of . . . → Read More: Liberalism’s Incoherence

Education Inflation

Paul Krugman is aghast at this chart, which shows how the Pell Grant has declined in relative cost coverage:

This is pretty much how inflation works. In the early stages, its effects are not very noticeable because an incentive has not yet taken place. As the incentive shift takes place—marking the beginning of a . . . → Read More: Education Inflation

Opportunities in Clean Mining: Dallas Kachan

Cleantech companies are exploring—and exploiting—the connections between many sectors of the energy, infrastructure and other industrial markets. Dallas Kachan, principal of cleantech research and consulting firm Kachan & Co. in Vancouver, points to the emergence of “clean” mining as an important investment theme for 2012. In this exclusive interview with The Critical Metals . . . → Read More: Opportunities in Clean Mining: Dallas Kachan

Mandated Heath Market Inefficiencies

Karl Denninger:

We cannot permit America to be the “pay line” for every worldwide drug and device development program. The same pill sold here in America for $25 is $2 in Canada and other nations.  The cost of reproduction is covered by the $2, but development is not.  The free market would normally prohibit . . . → Read More: Mandated Heath Market Inefficiencies

What’s The Point of Financial Aid?

I suppose that the original intent of financial aid—most particularly scholarships—was to attract good scholars who would be likely to become famous and thus increase the prestige of the university. By offering intelligent, driven individuals an opportunity to be educated for reduced rates or for free, universities could be assured that they would attract . . . → Read More: What’s The Point of Financial Aid?