Capitalism, Socialism, and Scalability

Jason Brennan considers an analogy:

Cohen’s book proceeds as follows. First, he has us imagine a camping trip among friends. Food and goods are shared freely. Everyone abides by (purportedly) socialist principles of community and equality. Everyone does his part. No one takes advantage of anyone else. No one free rides. Everyone contributes. Everyone . . . → Read More: Capitalism, Socialism, and Scalability

Are the Institutions of a “Good Society” the Same as Those of the “Great Society”?

In my last post I suggested that nearly everyone would agree that a good society has the following characteristics: · institutions that enable its members to live in peace; · institutions that provide opportunities for members to flourish; and · institutions that provide members with security against various threats to flourishing e.g. foreign military . . . → Read More: Are the Institutions of a “Good Society” the Same as Those of the “Great Society”?

What Are the Characteristics of a Good Society?

In my last post, (Is there such a thing as a good society?) I suggested that a good society would have good institutions – norms and laws that are good for its members.

In thinking about the characteristics of a good society different people tend to emphasise different things that they consider to be . . . → Read More: What Are the Characteristics of a Good Society?

How Could J.S. Mill Have Reconciled his Views on Liberty and Indoctrination of Morals?

In “John Stuart Mill, Victorian Firebrand” Richard Reeves suggests that the question of whether Mill’s essay, “Utilitarianism”, can be reconciled with his more famous essay, “On Liberty”, is one that “will keep scholars engaged for the foreseeable future” (p. 330). That is probably correct, but I don’t think Mill would have had a huge . . . → Read More: How Could J.S. Mill Have Reconciled his Views on Liberty and Indoctrination of Morals?

The Bloated Private Sector

The great insight of modern economics is the power of markets to align the interest of society and the individual. The idea that attending to your own affairs and following your passions is all that one must contribute to society is incredibly liberating. The market system has proven an incredibly powerful, efficient and innovate . . . → Read More: The Bloated Private Sector