Who is in charge of fiscal policy and tax policy?

In any country, various arms of government like to indulge in taxation of their own choice, and in setting up little treasuries that they control. However, it is quite clear that there must be only one treasury, and only one authority that determines taxation, through only one Finance Act.

In the Economic Times today, . . . → Read More: Who is in charge of fiscal policy and tax policy?

Blindly sending money down leaky pipes

Proposals to spend more on government programs in India are generally criticised on the grounds that this is sending more money down a leaky pipe. In addition to the problem that the pipes leak, there is an equally big problem that we have no idea about what happens at the other end.

In order . . . → Read More: Blindly sending money down leaky pipes

Water on Fire

Some may have noticed the emerging marketing theme arguing that Pittsburgh is a place for investment because of…   water. As in H2O.  The veracity of that is a topic unto itself. I always find it curious how the argument can be made when much of the region is subject to what could be a . . . → Read More: Water on Fire

Energy Technologies with a Competitive Edge: James McIlree

Anyone who’s ever endured a 20-minute blackout knows how important non-stop energy is to a modern economy. Nonetheless, the U.S. energy grid is deteriorating, says Analyst James McIlree of Dominick & Dominick. The bright side is that companies are stepping up to make sure that hospitals, phone service providers and similarly energy-reliant businesses . . . → Read More: Energy Technologies with a Competitive Edge: James McIlree

The widget illusion

The Economist runs a discussion forum titled The Economist By Invitation. In this, they recently setup a discussion about an opinion piece by Dani Rodrik about the future of manufacturing-led growth in emerging markets. I wrote a response there which is reproduced here.

The role of manufactures

I agree with a small element of . . . → Read More: The widget illusion

USAirways and the 'so what' question

What is really fascinating is that a potential new major reorganization at USAirways just barely makes it into the news cycle here any longer.  Maybe that makes sense given the number of flights left here, but I bet there would be ramifications no matter. It is also a real change from the past when, as with US . . . → Read More: USAirways and the ’so what’ question

Regulated cost of capital for airports

Many elements of infrastructure have natural monopoly characteristics. Under these conditions, if the owner of the infrastructure is profit-maximising, he is likely to impose high user charges and extract a monopoly rent. As a consequence, in many infrastructure services in most countries, independent regulators are established which control the user charge.

The critical building . . . → Read More: Regulated cost of capital for airports

Cambodia, Once Secret, Is Now Open for Business: Richard Stanger

Resource investors are always looking for the next untapped region and Richard Stanger thinks he has found it. President and founder of the Cambodian Association of Mining and Exploration Companies, Stanger has been working to get the word out about Cambodia, a growing, stable country with the right geology for some big discoveries. . . . → Read More: Cambodia, Once Secret, Is Now Open for Business: Richard Stanger

China's Future Deconstructed: Holmes vs. Chang

China has become the $5.88 trillion question in the world financial equation for 2012. In an attempt to gauge the direction of this economic elephant, Cambridge House International is asking two China experts to debate the health of the second-largest economy at the Vancouver Resource Investment Conference January 22. We called the two . . . → Read More: China’s Future Deconstructed: Holmes vs. Chang

Geordie Mark: Iron Ore Still Strong

In an environment of declining steel prices, Geordie Mark, mining analyst with Haywood Securities in Vancouver, nonetheless believes that iron ore juniors are poised for a rebound. Read his reasons for optimism in this exclusive Gold Report interview.

The Gold Report: About 37% of the world’s population is in China and India, . . . → Read More: Geordie Mark: Iron Ore Still Strong