Energy Investment Is an International Adventure: Darrell Bishop

Looking for outsized returns? Then broaden your horizons, suggests National Bank Financial Analyst Darrell Bishop, who focuses on regions where property acquisition is cheaper and oil sells at the Brent premium. In this exclusive interview with The Energy Report, Bishop whisks us around from Western Europe’s North Sea, to behind the former Iron . . . → Read More: Energy Investment Is an International Adventure: Darrell Bishop

Random Shots – Catching Up

After a week with the family in a cottage in Sweden Alpha Sources is ready to get back into the grind. Returning from holiday as a macro analyst is always daunting given the barrage of news and data that you will have inevitably “missed”. From reading the news and last week’s sell and . . . → Read More: Random Shots – Catching Up

Keynesian Tautologies

From Paul Krugman:

Watching Europe sink into recession – and Greece plunge into the abyss – I found myself wondering what it would take to convince the chattering classes that austerity in the face of an already depressed economy is a terrible idea.

After all, all it took was the predictable and predicted failure . . . → Read More: Keynesian Tautologies

Gold Prices Driven Higher by Europe and China: Greg Weldon and Grant Williams

Preserving wealth in a volatile political and financial world is a job for gold. Greg Weldon, publisher of Weldon’s Money Monitor newsletter and Grant Williams, a portfolio advisor at Vulpes Investment Management in Singapore, will share their insights at the Cambridge House California Investment Conference Feb. 11–12. In this exclusive interview with The . . . → Read More: Gold Prices Driven Higher by Europe and China: Greg Weldon and Grant Williams

First Act of Greek Default Proceedings Drawing to a Close

Global stock markets are up about 10% since the beginning of the year, volatility has collapsed, US economic data continue to defy even the mild slowdown proponents and the ECB seems to have backstopped the European banking system.

Yes, my dear reader. This is how quickly you move from away from the apocalyptic abyss . . . → Read More: First Act of Greek Default Proceedings Drawing to a Close

Banking follies in the eurozone

Edward Hugh has a brilliant analysis of recent events in the eurozone and especially how banks are leveraging the liquidity provided by the ECB to “cleanse” their balance sheet of bad assets and essentially exchanging these for freshly minted euro deposits at the ECB. I think we should be very clear what is going . . . → Read More: Banking follies in the eurozone

The perils of European debt crisis: divergence, retreat or decline?

Recent debacle at the summit of Brussels in the midst of the political intervention of the EU leaders to facilitate the institutional agreement between the European countries towards the formation of the European fiscal union has caused not only a long-standing dissolution of the “core countries” of the Eurozone and the UK but, more . . . → Read More: The perils of European debt crisis: divergence, retreat or decline?

Look for End of Debt Supercycle: Thoughts from the U.S. Global Investors 2012 Forecast

What do investors need to be watching out for in 2012? More Eurozone drama? Record gold highs? A hard landing in China? The U.S. Global Investors team addressed these questions with Endgame: The End of the Debt Supercycle author John Mauldin in a Jan. 5 Outlook 2012 webinar. The Streetwise Reports editors highlight . . . → Read More: Look for End of Debt Supercycle: Thoughts from the U.S. Global Investors 2012 Forecast

Caught out by Reality in Europe

The rumour mill is grinding particularly fast at the moment. Germany and France seem to be working on the famous nuclear solution, Spain plays tough on outsiders, the IMF is rumoured to be preparing an aid package for Italy not to mention Hungary and Austria (just like Belgium) has entered the rating agencies’ cross . . . → Read More: Caught out by Reality in Europe

Guide to the Eurozone crisis

How did it happen?

The worst financial crisis in the western world for nearly 80 years broke in September 2008.

It required banking/financial systems to be supported and recapitalised by governments across the EU and in the US.

In June 2009 it became apparent that the peripheral countries of the Eurozone (Greece, Portugal, Spain . . . → Read More: Guide to the Eurozone crisis