Fraud

Pay close attention to this chart: [Source] This is a problem. As a libertarian, I generally view regulation as pointless, needlessly expensive, counterproductive, and anti-liberty. As such, I oppose a good portion of government interference in the economy. However, committing fraud is not simply a matter of failing to comply with ticky-tack regulation. Fundamentally, . . . → Read More: Fraud

Drug Price and Violence

ASI:

The other side of all this, which I’m surprised the article doesn’t mention, is that lower costs mean that addicts find it easier to pay for their habit. They’re less likely to resort to theft and mugging, and so on. It’s also noteworthy that crack probably only emerged as a way to get . . . → Read More: Drug Price and Violence

Social Security Thy Name is Ponzi

I’m not sure why so many are upset with Rick Perry calling Social Security a Ponzi scheme. I said the same thing way back in March, but the media hardly seemed to care. Many economists have weighed in on this debate, and Walter Williams provides a decent summary of their sentiments:

Aside from these . . . → Read More: Social Security Thy Name is Ponzi

Gun Control and Cost Analysis

Reason Magazine takes a crack at leftist myths:

The opponents rely on a litany of horribles. The Violence Policy Center in Washington claims that since May 2007, individuals licensed to carry guns killed 286 private citizens and 11 law enforcement officers and committed 18 mass shootings. This gory record, it asserts, destroys the myth . . . → Read More: Gun Control and Cost Analysis

Death Penalty Cases – An Economic Viewpoint

I sometimes wonder how recent Supreme Court decisions that are seemingly non economic related affect local economies. Case in point. I live in South Louisiana where the Kennedy v Louisiana case got plenty of media air-play. In case you live in a cave, the case revolved around whether or not . . . → Read More: Death Penalty Cases – An Economic Viewpoint

Terrorism in the UK: Exploited.

The government’s anti-terrorism ardour was endorsed again last week, as Section 76 of the new Counter Terrorism Act came into force on the 15th February. Section 76 in itself, seems to highlight the laudable extremes the government are willing to go to to ensure our safety. Although I understand that the government need something . . . → Read More: Terrorism in the UK: Exploited.

Teaching a Man to Fish: How to Solve Youth Unemployment in the U.S.

This year, unemployment rates among young people in the United States have been increasing to levels not seen since the early 1990s. Youth unemployment rates are usually a good indicator of the overall state of an economy, since young people typically face the greatest difficulties in finding employment in times of recession and, lacking . . . → Read More: Teaching a Man to Fish: How to Solve Youth Unemployment in the U.S.

Is There a Correlation Between Crime and the Economy?

Crime rates should drop during good economic times and rise during bad ones. So very soon if you are walking the streets of New York late at night, you may be at risk of being mugged by gangs of investment bankers, driven to acts of desperate violence by the travails of the credit markets. . . . → Read More: Is There a Correlation Between Crime and the Economy?

Anthrax Scare: Who’s Responsible and Why It Matters

Why would a scientist who had built his career on researching drugs and vaccines to protect his countrymen from anthrax purposely mail letters contaminated with anthrax to two government officials of the very country he is trying to protect? More importantly, was Bruce Ivins, a U.S. Army researcher of 35 years, the true culprit . . . → Read More: Anthrax Scare: Who’s Responsible and Why It Matters