The Curious Case of Liquidity Traps and Missing Collateral - Part 1

The debate is on! Are we in a liquidity trap and if so what should we do? Why is the financial system depleted of collateral and what does this mean? Should policy makers and central banks be even more “irresponsible” [1] and conduct more monetized deficit spending? What does a lack of triple A . . . → Read More: The Curious Case of Liquidity Traps and Missing Collateral – Part 1

China Moves Towards More Easing ...

This may be a targeted and essentially pinpointed move, but looking at the data coming on China in the first quarter of 2012, I think there is plenty more to come as China tries to come to grips with a rapidly slowing economy.

Quote Bloomberg

China boosted rural credit by cutting reserve requirements for . . . → Read More: China Moves Towards More Easing …

A Troubling Sentence

From the Grey Lady:

The United States trade deficit surged in January to the widest imbalance in more than three years after imports grew faster than exports.

This is not a good sign. The US economy is predicated on false demand, by which I mean that the US, and the citizens thereof, buy a . . . → Read More: A Troubling Sentence

I’ll gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today

Was it Popeye’s friend, Wimpy, who kept asking for a hamburger on credit? Today’s credit markets are anything but robust, with reduced demand and supply for borrowed funds. Always eager to find obscure terms for modern dilemmas, economists refer to this condition as a liquidity trap. With a little prodding from Facebook friend and . . . → Read More: I’ll gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today

Uncomfortable times in real estate in store?

Patrick Chovanec has a fascinating article in Foreign Affairs, titled China’s Real Estate Bubble May Have Just Popped. This is interesting and important from two points of view.

First, bad news for China is bad news for the world economy. We are already in a bleak environment, with difficulties in Europe, Japan, the US, . . . → Read More: Uncomfortable times in real estate in store?

Deflation Is Coming: Jay Taylor

Jay Taylor believes the biggest challenge facing the U.S.—deflation—could mean a better year, or even decade, for junior gold stocks. Taylor, editor of Jay Taylor’s Gold, Energy & Tech Stocks, has ridden some equities to the bottom of this punishing market and is ready to pile more cash into small gold companies. In . . . → Read More: Deflation Is Coming: Jay Taylor

European Bank Runs And Underestimated Physical Gold Demand

The demand for gold is vastly underestimated. About 18 months ago I wrote about Euro Gold and the Euro Zone and Euro Evaporation Leading To Credit Default Swaps and IMF Gold. One key excerpt was:

The Euro is broken. This was its destiny. This is the destiny of all fiat currencies. These bureau-rats cannot . . . → Read More: European Bank Runs And Underestimated Physical Gold Demand

Interesting readings

Thomas E. Ricks (in Foreign Policy) and Lawrence Wright (in New Yorker) on Pakistan.

C. Rangarajan on the debate about the debt management office and about inflation targeting (the latter is an interview with Tamal Bandyopadhyay).

Saurabh Mishra, Susanna Lundstrom and Rahul Anand have a fascinating piece on the sophistication of . . . → Read More: Interesting Readings for May 20, 2011

Debtors vs. Creditors

Those interested in this issue, which I have covered in this and this post, will find FOFOA’s latest post useful.

FOFOA agrees with Marx that “the history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggle” but says that he got the classes wrong:

The two classes are not the Labour and . . . → Read More: Debtors vs. Creditors

Profit Margins, Down to Earth?

One of my good friends who runs a small investment boutique pointed me towards today’s chart of the day from Bloomberg showing the flight phoenix of US corporates’ profit margins.

I know that the chart is difficult to read but you only really need to look at the . . . → Read More: Profit Margins, Down to Earth?