The left-libertarian argument against corporations, in brief

This is intended as a brief response to Tibor R. Machan’s latest piece:

It has always been my view that corporations are groups of people united for various purposes, often to benefit from a business venture guided by competent management. Initially I worried little about the legal details, nor even about the legal history. . . . → Read More: The left-libertarian argument against corporations, in brief

Quibble, I Shall

Quoth Thomas Frank in The Wall Street Journal last week:

This was once a familiar line of criticism: Big business’s sin was that it wasn’t entrepreneurial enough. If given the opportunity, business would use government to form cartels and suppress competition. Free markets must thus be protected from the grasp of the corporate monster. . . . → Read More: Quibble, I Shall

Financial Market Conditions at Mid-Year

As one of the large number of Americans who depends on a positive business and investment environment for his prosperity, I regarded the election of Barack Obama as president with Democrat majorities in the House and Senate with considerable concern.

But more than the usual number of my fellow businesspeople and investors supported them, . . . → Read More: Financial Market Conditions at Mid-Year

Reintroducing the Enron Rule

I am bringing back an old thought that first occurred to me in 2001 after the collapse of Enron. Businesses exist to create real value for real people. Any business should be able to explain how the are adding value and for whom. Ideally, this should be a simple process; a sentence or at . . . → Read More: Reintroducing the Enron Rule

The Great Penance

When the economic crisis becomes acute, when the rate of profit sinks towards zero, the bourgeoisie can see only one way to restore its profits: it empties the pockets of the people down to the last centime. It resorts to what M. Caillaux, once finance minister of France, expressively calls “the great penance”: brutal . . . → Read More: The Great Penance

Trading Off: Virtual Companies and Relative Economics

The advantages of going virtual for companies are obvious. One of the greatest of these, yet one that’s often overlooked, is the ability to select employees without geographical limitations or relocation costs. This also carries cost-of-living possibilities even within national borders, as, for example, the price of an editor outside of . . . → Read More: Trading Off: Virtual Companies and Relative Economics

Credit Crunch Forcing Entrepreneurs to Turn to Online Communities for Funding

Traditional global credit markets have frozen, and they’re proving difficult to unstick. Under-capitalized banks are not keen to lend out what’s left on their balance sheets—not even and sometimes especially not to each other—and the value of the U.S. currency has risen steeply relative to those of other nations as banks around the world . . . → Read More: Credit Crunch Forcing Entrepreneurs to Turn to Online Communities for Funding

Lessons on Innovation from the CEO of Proctor & Gamble

The Game-Changer: How You Can Drive Revenue and Profit Growth With Innovation. By A. G. Lafley & Ram Charan. Crown Business, 2008. 352 pages. $27.50.

As the subtitle (How You Can Drive Revenue and Profit Growth) of The Game-Changer indicates, this recent volume by A. G. Lafley and Ram Charan is meant more as . . . → Read More: Lessons on Innovation from the CEO of Proctor & Gamble

American University Research

University, Inc.: The Corporate Corruption of American Higher Education. By Jennifer Washburn. Basic Books, 2005. 326 pages. $26.00.

University, Inc.: The Corporate Corruption of American Higher Education is a necessary book but also a sobering, even depressing one. If you’re concerned about your health, your education or your country, you won’t enjoy what you . . . → Read More: American University Research