Child Labor and Economic Development: Making It Pay to Go to School

Around the world, millions of children are engaged in child labor. The International Labour Organization (ILO) has estimated that up to 1 in 5 children globally are working, with the proportion even higher in some regions of Africa and Asia. Recent estimates of the overall numbers involved range from 158 to 246 million, although . . . → Read More: Child Labor and Economic Development: Making It Pay to Go to School

Teaching a Man to Fish: How to Solve Youth Unemployment in the U.S.

This year, unemployment rates among young people in the United States have been increasing to levels not seen since the early 1990s. Youth unemployment rates are usually a good indicator of the overall state of an economy, since young people typically face the greatest difficulties in finding employment in times of recession and, lacking . . . → Read More: Teaching a Man to Fish: How to Solve Youth Unemployment in the U.S.

How Can Employers Limit the Cost of Absenteeism? An International Look

Unscheduled staff absence due to illness or other reasons can be very costly for employers, official statistics and survey data reveal. In the UK it was reported by the Health and Safety Commission that 36 million days of work were lost due to sickness absence in 2006 and 2007, and the Chartered Institute of . . . → Read More: How Can Employers Limit the Cost of Absenteeism? An International Look

America’s Aging Workforce: It’s Time for Employers to Accept Reality

The current financial crisis in the U.S. is hitting everyone hard, perhaps not least the older population. Many in this age group will have taken early retirement in recent years and may now be starting to feel the pinch due to unexpected price rises. Some of these seniors, along with others who just miss . . . → Read More: America’s Aging Workforce: It’s Time for Employers to Accept Reality

People with Disabilities in the U.S. Labor Market

According to a national study by researchers at Cornell University, only 37.7% of people with disabilities in the U.S. population were employed in 2006, compared with 79.7 percent of people without disabilities. Moreover, surveys have consistently shown the average annual earnings of employed people with disabilities to be significantly lower than those for the . . . → Read More: People with Disabilities in the U.S. Labor Market

Neo-Nazism in Europe

Extremist political groups and parties often flourish in regions of economic deprivation, where populations feel alienated from the establishment, disillusioned by mainstream politics and seek convenient scapegoats for their circumstances. This may mean that one outcome of the current global economic downturn and its exacerbating impact on already disadvantaged areas may be a expansion . . . → Read More: Neo-Nazism in Europe

The Costs and Benefits of the Electronic Tagging of Criminals

Overcrowding of prisons is putting pressure on criminal justice systems to use alternatives to custodial sentences. Electronic tagging is one method which can be used either instead of, or to reduce the length of, a prison sentence or as part of a non-custodial sentence. This is in effect a form of house arrest or . . . → Read More: The Costs and Benefits of the Electronic Tagging of Criminals

Islamophobia in Europe

According to a recent article in the New York Times Magazine, Europe is in the grip of “an anti-Islamic bias that is becoming institutionalized in the continent’s otherwise ordinary politics.” In the UK, a research report published earlier this year by the Institute of Race Relations argued that Islamophobia is hindering efforts to integrate . . . → Read More: Islamophobia in Europe

International Working Patterns, Part III: Teleworking

With soaring fuel prices adversely affecting consumers and businesses throughout the world, this might be a good time for employers to explore or reexamine the possible benefits of teleworking. Also often referred to as telecommuting, a name which reflects the idea of technological communications replacing the traditional commute to work, telework involves regularly working . . . → Read More: International Working Patterns, Part III: Teleworking

International Working Patterns, Part II: Working Outside the Box

The previous article in this series highlighted the variations in hours of work between different countries and the factors which influence these. This article examines international differences in the extent and composition of non-standard employment, such as part-time and temporary work and fixed-term contracts, and explores some of the reasons for these differences.

In . . . → Read More: International Working Patterns, Part II: Working Outside the Box