Is the Amero Real?

Conspiracy theorists have long been on guard against the “New World Order” – particularly ever since then-President George H.W. Bush uttered the phrase during his 1991 State of the Union address – but lately, talk of a “North American Union” merger between the United States, Mexico, and Canada has made the leap from late-night . . . → Read More: Is the Amero Real?

What a Human Being Really Is: Why Economics Has Gone So Wrong

The twentieth century taught us everything we need to know about human nature. For every grisly lesson learned on one end of the scale (the niche that belongs to Hitler, Stalin and the Khmer Rouge), we witnessed a remarkable example of sacrificial love for others at the opposite end (Mahatma Gandhi, Mother Teresa and . . . → Read More: What a Human Being Really Is: Why Economics Has Gone So Wrong

How Telemedicine Can Actually Work

My last post generated an interesting comment from a reader questioning whether telemedicine can actually be used to do a physical exam. The reader brings up some great questions about how telemedicine can actually work. Such questions and resistance to new technology clearly highlight the struggle for technological progress in medicine.

While I agree . . . → Read More: How Telemedicine Can Actually Work

Why We Are Too Rational to Stop Polluting, Part 2

In the previous article, I explained how in any game, it is reasonable to assume that a stable outcome will be a Nash Equilibrium. Today, I will show how it is impossible for rational people like us to save the planet by cooperating to stop using carbon fuels.

Currently, as things stand, . . . → Read More: Why We Are Too Rational to Stop Polluting, Part 2

New Links To Stroke Discovered

Stroke affects men and women around the world in a devastating manner. Although some strokes are more severe than others, they almost always lead to a change in the patient’s lifestyle. Recently, two articles have found interesting links to stroke, what may cause it and easy ways to attempt to prevent it.

When many . . . → Read More: New Links To Stroke Discovered

The Government’s Latest Efforts to Rein in Oil Speculators

The rising oil prices have forced the government to act. Many experts have blamed the recent increase in oil prices on speculation. The government is planning to introduce a legislation – the Stop Excessive Energy Speculation Act – in an attempt to rein in speculations in the oil market. Will the legislation in its . . . → Read More: The Government’s Latest Efforts to Rein in Oil Speculators

How Immigrants and Foreigners Keep Prices Low

If one accepts the basic free-market concepts of comparative advantage and division of labor, it naturally follows that free trade and liberal immigration—the hallmarks of globalization—are good things. Virtually no economists dissent from this premise, and yet so much of the American public remains hostile to globalization. Why is this the case?

Many people . . . → Read More: How Immigrants and Foreigners Keep Prices Low

Can the Housing Rescue Bill Really Work?

Not too long ago, I confess I was in a rather panicked state of mind about the economy. This was after Bear Stearns tanked but before IndyMac was seized by the FDIC. I thought that if the U.S. government could intervene in a big way and refinance homeowners who were facing foreclosure, then the . . . → Read More: Can the Housing Rescue Bill Really Work?

Medical Tourism: The Latest Trend in Healthcare

Medical tourism may be defined as seeking healthcare outside one’s own country. This is becoming more common as people search for affordable healthcare. In the U.S., patients travel to countries that perform the procedure they need for a fraction of the cost of the same procedure done domestically. In Canada, . . . → Read More: Medical Tourism: The Latest Trend in Healthcare

Survival of the Corporate Fittest: The Future of Automotive Companies

Trains Lose

On May 10, 1869, the golden spike was driven home at Promontory Summit, Utah, and the first transcontinental railroad spanned the United States. For the next 60 years railroads were king, moving people, freight and the U.S. mail throughout the nation. By the time the U.S. entered World War I, the railroads . . . → Read More: Survival of the Corporate Fittest: The Future of Automotive Companies